ITS Instructor Jo Boring on Authenticity & Contagiously Fun Shows – ALLAF 035

Hear how murder mystery writer Jo loves the process of preparing for a performance even more than the show and values sharing experiences with other dancers more than perfection in the spotlight. And she likes to set drinks on fire…

Jo Boring:

Let’s get ridiculous.

Alicia:

Ooh, what an invitation from Jo Boring. Now, Jo Boring, what an interesting last name for a gal like you.

Jo Boring:

Alicia Free. That is a fitting name for a gal like you.

Alicia:

Thank you.

Jo Boring:

I married into my name. I am one of the Borings now. We reside on a compound. That’s the truth. Over in Marathon, New York. It’s easy to remember if nothing else. And the students enjoy it. They have much fun at my expense.

Alicia:

She holds a degree in communication as well as a graduates degree in counseling. Throughout her varied experiences she found working with young adults to help them overcome their obstacles and achieve their dreams the most fulfilling.

Jo Boring:

Word. Surly teens are my favorite.

Alicia:

God bless you.

Jo Boring:

Yes, we all have to have our gifts.

Alicia:

Oh my goodness. So, all the while, Jo had a passion for dance, specifically belly dance, which she found as a young adult herself. Check out episode 34 of this podcast where I interviewed Jo’s business partner, Tessa Trueheart and we talk more about their fabulous dance studio, Belly Set Go. Jo and Tessa are quite the team. They have launched an online learning opportunity for all of us that includes classes on belly dance, burlesque, chairlesque, bellyesque, voguing and more on teambellysetgo.com. Just wanted to put that out there right at the get go.

Belly, Set, Go! brings together Jo’s two loves: dance and helping others find meaning and purpose through self expression.

DANCEABLE RITUAL: The Luna Hug

Alicia:

Jo, do you have a danceable ritual that you would like to share?

Jo Boring:

When I’ve listened to your podcasts in the past, I know that a lot of dancers or soloists who have specific rituals unto themselves, which has been awesome to learn about, but I didn’t really have anything that was similar and I’m kind of not a ritually person. I enjoy rituals, I should have more of them, but I kind of fly by the seat of my pants on a daily basis. I don’t really have a nighttime routine or a morning routine. Every day is a different grab bag.

So, the one thing that popped to my mind first regarding dance and rituals is a ritual that The Lunachix have before they go on stage and I thought that would be worth sharing. I think as a group oriented person, it’s so important when you’re going into a performance situation to help everyone feel the best they can possibly feel and there’s so much stress and anxiety that comes right before performance because you have those nerves of course, and the jitters and you’ve been working on this thing for however many months, however many hours and I just always want the dancers to feel positive feelings at that time and not be feeling like, “Oh what happens if I mess up?” or “I don’t want to disappoint,” any of those types of feelings.

So, the ritual that we have backstage, it can go a little differently each time, but it’s one of love and connection and just saying, “Hey, we’re here and isn’t that awesome and we’re going to go out and do this awesome thing. And it really doesn’t matter. All of the little things that could go wrong, it doesn’t matter.” So, we give a Luna Hug. Sometimes other people come into the circle if they consent, because there’s a lot of touching that goes on in there.

You circle up and you hug all around and then you do the biggest exterior hip circle that you can and so it’s like this whole revolving circle of love with hips all a sundry, and you have to go like this… “Wooh.”

And if you don’t, you’re not really doing a Luna Hug. We have scared people before with the “Wooh” and it’s a lot if you’re not used to it. So, we try to be gentle.

Alicia:

So, it’s a pre-dance. It’s a prelude to dance.

Jo Boring:

Yeah. For me, it’s just setting our minds in a good place before we go on stage. So, that’s one thing that we do every time that feels good and that’s the first thing that popped to my mind when you said Danceable Ritual.

Alicia:

Are you familiar with the term state change?

It sounds like a perfect mechanism for a state change when people are nervous and thinking about themselves and then all of a sudden they’re touching every other dancer and doing something goofy and then it loosens them up. It’s a very different state of mind that that brings them into.

Jo Boring:

I wish I could Luna Hug before everything I do, really.

Alicia:

Nice. And The Lunachix is one of your troupes.

Jo Boring:

Yes. Well, I’ve been in troupes before, but it’s the first troupe that I was in charge of and we formed in 2013 by the light of a silvery moon.

Alicia:

When we were together at Super Fun Dance Camp, you stepped up to teach Jill Parker‘s choreography to a room of something like a hundred people when poor Jill got a stomach bug and you did it so well. I mean, people had come there to study with Jill. Jill couldn’t do it, but you made it happen still. You gave that choreography, you transmitted the wisdom. It was beautiful to watch from my spot.

Jo Boring:

I channeled Jill Parker. Is that what you’re saying?

Alicia:

You channeled Jill.

Jo Boring:

Oh, that is a great compliment.

Alicia:

Yes, you did. You really did. In your own way, of course, but you communicated what she needed communicated to the room and I thought the performance was awesome. It was amazing to have so many people doing all these different formation situations. I guess it was the clusters of formation. I’d never seen anything like that, to be honest.

What are your secrets to being so clear and consistent when you teach?

Jo Boring:

So, first, I’ll talk about my two main teachers. I’ve had a lot of wonderful teachers, but I would say my biggest inspirations are Jill (Parker) and Amy Sigil and I think if I have anything to offer in terms of group facilitation and teaching clarity, a lot of it came from them.

With Jill, I feel like I’ve spent a lot of time studying her format. She’s a very generous teacher. There are dance situations where I don’t feel the most comfortable or confident or knowledgeable, but I can think to myself, Jo, you have danced X hundred amount of hours with Jill Parker and if she thinks you can teach her stuff.

Part of it for me, is the confidence in being given that permission or that blessing or having that mentor. When Jill first gave Tessa and I the class that she left when she moved away, I remember saying I can’t teach anything but ITS (Improvisational Tribal Style) because ITS was the thing that I had studied with Amy Sigil and that I had been certified to teach and given the stamp of approval and I felt like I needed that to teach something and that was really important to me at the time because going to Amy for a second, same teachable generosity, all of that is very much her teaching spirit as it is Jill’s. They have that very much in common.

Alicia:

Just in case this is new to you, ITS is short for improvisational tribal style. Amy Sigil of Unmata created it. It’s a dance language that was born out of ATS or American tribal style, where groups of dancers respond to cues. It looks like choreography, but it’s group improv.

Jo Boring:

So, I feel like ITS gave me that first bit of confidence to teach and then Jill gave me that next boost of I’m telling you that I want you to take this class and then I had to kind of do some work on my confidence to step into that and accept that, but that was a few years ago and having her friendship and support and mentorship through the years, yeah, I just feel like I know her vocabulary. I’m not saying I’m the best execution of it, of all. You know what I’m saying? I still always am working on my technique, but I can sit and confidently say that it’s something I’ve worked really hard on and her confidence in me makes me confident in myself.

Jo Boring:

Working in education, I think no matter what the subject is, no matter what the age of the person is, you just pick up stuff over time about how people learn what’s too much to throw out at once, what’s too little. People need appropriate challenges. Reading the room, where are people at, what are they struggling with? Being able to see that and integrate that information and then turn around and teach it a different way or explain it a different way, I think that’s just working in education for a long time.

Alicia:

So, one of them was you focused on a mentor and stuck with them for a while, two mentors, and so that gave you the confidence to stand up and transmit what they’re teaching.

Jo Boring:

Yeah, I mean I think I had a lot of self doubt when I first started teaching. Why am I qualified?

It’s the same way I felt the first time I ever walked into a room as a professional counselor and I was supposed to have some sort of answers and I remember that my counseling advisor said, “You are enough.”

Alicia:

You are enough.

Jo Boring:

You know what I mean?

If you’re a person whose intentions are good and you care about people, that’s enough.

But all of that being said, I was very scared at Super Fun Dance Camp. I’m pretty confident in working with groups. So, the staging of the piece didn’t scare me as much, but I was worried because a lot of people traveled a long way to take Jill Parker’s class and I just didn’t want them to leave disappointed, but they were lovely, lovely, lovely about it and everybody could see how sick she was and nobody had any problems, but that was on my heart that I was just like, “Oh, I hope this isn’t disappointing.”

Alicia:

I can speak for myself. I was very excited that Jill had shared her wisdom enough to have somebody that could step up and share it in her almost absence.

Jo Boring:

Yeah, but she was there giving us love from the corner even in her bedridden state.

Alicia:

That’s right. Great. Jo Boring and Tessa True Heart own Belly Set Go, a dance studio that is high up in old factory building that has undies all over it because it was a corset factory.

Jo Boring:

I know. I just love history. I got that from my mother, and I love thinking for the good or the bad or you know, what their lives were like. I like thinking about the women that worked here and those corsets are part of that. So, we love our landlord here and he let me clean out the stock room.

And I don’t know what we’re going to do with all these corsets, but by golly, we’re going to die trying to make things of beauty and share them.

And we’ve had workshops where people, like burlesque performers, belly dance performers, anybody interested in the performance arts or maybe they just want a pretty thing. So, as you can see, a lot of them are, I call them very practicable and serviceable. They’re all plain white, off white. Some of them are a little bit more decorative than others, but these were pretty practical garments. But as you can see over on that wall, superhero-

Alicia:

There’s some bedazzled granny panties over there.

Jo Boring:

I bedazzled them my very own self. And we do workshops like that. It’s so much fun. And I want to work with the lady downstairs at the Instant Artist. She has a paint and sip. Wouldn’t it be so fun to come here with your gal pals or you know, any pals, all pals welcome. Pick out your own corset and sit and hand paint it as part of a paint and sip?

Alicia:

That’s a cool idea.

Jo Boring:

You’re invited.

Alicia:

Now, it’s time for some music.

DANCEABLE SONG: Cleopatra in New York

Alicia:

Jo, do you have a danceable song that you would like to share?

Jo Boring:

I have to give a shout out to all the dancers who make their playlists on Spotify public. Much love and mad respect. So, you can check out the playlist that I’m going to talk about. April Rose is a wonderful dancer who has many public playlists on Spotify and I love just exposing myself to new music and I’m going to use one of hers because she has so many great ones that she makes public, but from a playlist of April Rose’s called Shimmy Soiree Workshop, the song is “Cleopatra in New York Zim Zam Mix.”

Alicia:

Ooh.

Jo Boring:

(music)

Jo Boring:

And it says it’s by Nick Edemas, Carol C. Zimzam.

Alicia:

Love it. So, it’s Fusion, it’s got some modern elements, it’s got some drum machine action in it, got some traditional instruments in it too.

Jo Boring:

Yeah. It does have modern elements. I think I err sometimes to a fault to the side of modern music and I love middle Eastern music and I love traditional songs. Just kind of into that Ren fair, Bal Anat, outdoor vibe. So, I was looking for music that feels true to myself, but also true to belly dance and I thought that that was a nice song. I like it a lot.

Alicia:

Sweet. “Cleopatra in New York,” it’ll be on the Belly Dance Body and Soul Spotify playlist. Thank you to April Rose.

Jo Boring:

Yes, she makes many of her playlists public.

Alicia:

Thank you to April Rose.

DAMN SEXY DANCE MOVE: Vintage Back 8s

Alicia:

What damn sexy dance move would you like to share?

Jo Boring:

Vintage back eights that I learned from Jill Parker. Other people, of course, do back eights with the hips over foot patterns. I like her stylization. It’s a traveling move. I think it travels quite glidingly, if you will. I like the foot work pattern. It starts with a back step and the step was one that was hard for me at first because it’s not as intuitive as some foot patterns are. It’s one of those moves that makes you feel like you’re dancing. Sometimes I am more of a technical kind of in my head like, now we move the right foot, now we move the left foot. So, I really enjoy people’s styles when they make me feel graceful and languid and fluid and juicy.

Alicia:

So, it’s a horizontal eight?

Jo Boring:

Yes. You’re starting with a back step that’s crossing behind the other foot and it’s sending your hips from one side to the other and if you let your hips kind of go on top of the foot work as it kind of wants to anyway, you can make quite a swath of your hips, which is the prettiest element of the move. The feet are just allowing the hips to move in that horizontal figure eight front to back motion over top of your feetsies.

Alicia:

And you’re doing a step back, like a rock back and a rock forward?

Jo Boring:

I wouldn’t say it’s a rock, it’s just like a gliding horizontal eight as you just glide down the stage. It’s really quite lovely.

Alicia:

I never think of an horizontal eight as a travel step, so this is such a nice way to-

Jo Boring:

Exactly, I love it.

Alicia:

… Combine it with something unlikely.

Jo Boring:

It feels very golden era-y to me and I really like that. It’s not a genre that comes naturally to my body, but if I really tried to dig into somebody else’s movement style, sometimes I can find a move like that that makes me feel successful.

Alicia:

Cool.

Jo Boring:

I don’t know if she would call it the same. I just called it vintage because it has that old feel and sometimes she describes different movements of hers that way. A vintage back eight.

Alicia:

Speaking of vintage and back in time, tell us about your love for the 1920s.

Jo Boring:

When I was choreographing for the Luna Chicks before I got into ITS or before I got into Jill’s stuff or before I started dancing with Tessa, I didn’t have a lot of movement vocabulary to pull from. And the stuff that comes to me more naturally tends to be more angular. Interesting hands sometimes or formations. I just think kind of technically and mathematically.

Jo Boring:

So, I think I needed to dance with some different people to find a softer edge and a really dancey vibe. So yeah, I love that because when I was growing up we didn’t watch television. I mean, at certain times I can remember a year that we had a little TV with an antenna and maybe I watched Oprah twice or something, but we really had probably about 17 VHS tapes that had different things recorded on them. And if it wasn’t one of the things on those VHS tapes, then I probably didn’t see it until I was maybe 16 or 17. Or unless it was Pretty Woman, which I hid underneath my mattress. Don’t tell my mom. Okay?

Alicia:

Is it still there?

Jo Boring:

No. So, there was a lot of old movies on those VHS tapes and I can remember watching Cyd Charisse and singing in the rain and that, oh my goodness. The legs for days. Yes. I’m thrilled right now thinking about it. And I also loved dance and theater and those things growing up, but I was on a dairy farm and I went to a very small school that was a parochial school and I just didn’t have a lot of access to things like that. So, they were just things that kind of lived in my head. But I had a very active imagination. And so I just love that style. It’s what I would fantasize a lot about when I was a kid and I like theater meets dance, meets the Ziegfeld Follies and radio.

Alicia:

Now, let’s take a moment to dote on delicious whole food that makes us dancers glow.

LIGHTEN MY BODY FOOD: Blackberries

Alicia:

What is one vegan whole food ingredient that you love?

Jo Boring:

All right, can I make a confession?

Alicia:

Do it.

Jo Boring:

Okay. I am all for and support many of my friends’ dietary needs and life choices, but I am so undereducated that I had to look up on the Interweb’s list of vegan ingredients. I mean, I understand what vegan means, but you know, berries. Are berries a vegan, whole food ingredient?

Alicia:

They’re totally-

Jo Boring:

I would like to spotlight blackberries, mostly the big ones.

Alicia:

You like the big ones?

Jo Boring:

I like the big juicy ones. If we’re talking about blueberries, I like the small really tart ones, but if we’re talking about blackberries, I want to pick them from the bush myself. And yes, the bigger the better.

Alicia:

And they have a lot of good ones in the store now. I feel like when I was a kid you couldn’t just go get berries anytime of year from the store. Good luck.

Jo Boring:

We had berry bushes on the farm though. So, I have very fond memories.

Alicia:

You go way back.

Jo Boring:

We had blackberries and raspberries.

Alicia:

Yeah, the term vegan makes people think it’s got to be something exclusive, but I’m really just saying a plant.

Jo Boring:

That’s what I realize and that’s what I thought, but I’m very, like I said, undereducated on the subject.

Alicia:

You knew about berries.

Jo Boring:

And I don’t cook, really.

Alicia:

Oh yeah?

Jo Boring:

No, so.

Alicia:

Does your husband cook?

Jo Boring:

Neither of us I would characterize as cooks, but we live on the compound and somebody cooks and my father-in-law delights in meal prepping for the whole compound, so.

Alicia:

That’s amazing.

Jo Boring:

Yeah, it’s amazing.

Alicia:

Ooh, what a bonus of living on a compound. Yeah, you can still eat home cooked food, but you don’t have to cook.

Jo Boring:

You don’t have to cook it yourself.

Alicia:

Very good.

Jo Boring:

I have other skills. I provide beverages.

Alicia:

Ahh.

Jo Boring:

I’m a good bartender.

Alicia:

Ooh, I didn’t know that. Do you ever make any drinks with blackberries?

Jo Boring:

I certainly have. My favorite signature drink that I like to bring to parties to just put it up a notch,

a scorpion bowl, the kind with the long straws that everybody drinks out of the bowl and you light the middle on fire.

I have my own scorpion bowls and I looked for the long straws on the internet and the only place I could find them, they sold them in a wholesale batch of 3000 straws and so I’ve made it my mission in life to make enough scorpion bowls at enough events that I use up those straws someday and I’m doing pretty good. I’m going to get there. It’s going to happen.

5 Recipes for Cocktails That You Can Light on Fire

Alicia:

Oh, my God. So back in Peace Corps, I was called Whiskey Bucket because I liked to make whiskey buckets. Whiskey Busket is really what I would end up asking people would they like some of my Whiskey Busket, but yes, we use straws as well out of the bucket. We never set it on fire though.

Jo Boring:

That’s an important piece.

Alicia:

Maybe I have to research how to set drinks on fire.

Jo Boring:

Yeah. It’s not hard, but my tip is just to do all pyrotechnics at the beginning of your evening and not when you’re calling it a whiskey busket. No. No flames near you then.

Alicia:

Very responsible. Very responsible.

Jo Boring:

I try. I try to be responsible.

Alicia:

Scorpion bowl. Oh my goodness. Thank you for saying I had to look up what a vegan ingredient was as a-

Jo Boring:

I’m prepared to be truthful here.

Alicia:

I love it. You give other people permission to be truthful when you do such a thing. Thank you.

Jo Boring:

You’re welcome.

Alicia:

Let’s play dress up.

MAKE YOU SHINE COSTUME TIP: Make Headpieces

Alicia:

What is one costume tip that you want to share?

Jo Boring:

My first gut reaction is to say, “Wear whatever the hell you want,” but I’m going to dial it back for a second and recognize that we are sometimes in a position where we are dancing a certain piece or a certain look or a certain vibe for a particular reason or for a particular cultural event and certainly in those instances I don’t put on whatever the hell I want. Certainly there are times where we must costume in a certain way for that event.

So, I dialed my sass back on that one, but I have really enjoyed headpieces lately and I think it’s really amazing what you can make yourself. I’ve been really pleased with what I can make myself in regards to just different accessories or adornments and Luna Chicks have played a lot lately with headpieces and people just being,

“Where did you get those opulent headpieces?” And we’ll be like, “This was one package of bamboo skewers and a can of spray paint.

Alicia:

Oh, think I saw those.

Jo Boring:

Yes, that was literally a headband, cardboard, hot glue, bamboo skewers, spray paint, coochie coins and bones. We’re upstate New York country gals and I at some point, even before the Luna Chicks and the troupe I was in prior, we’re like, “What do we have at our disposal to decorate with that maybe others don’t have?” Bones.

Alicia:

Like chicken bones?

Jo Boring:

All kinds of bones. Deer. I have a lot of cow bones, unfortunately. I would like the cows to live forever, but they don’t, Alicia.

Alicia:

We don’t either.

Jo Boring:

They don’t. None of us do. And I have to think to myself that if I were an animal, if you must die, then you can live on in costuming.

Alicia:

I’ll tell you what, I might call myself vegan, but in terms of clothing, I am not.

Jo Boring:

Oh. Well, I will say that no animals were harmed. Yes, we’re very pro animal and they were all just animals that died of natural causes. So, I feel good about that.

Alicia:

And they live on in costuming.

Jo Boring:

They do.

Alicia:

I like it.

Jo Boring:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So, yeah.

Alicia:

From what I’ve seen, you are quite a nurturer, very inclusive, lighthearted in a way that makes people feel welcome to dance with you and you really care about your students and fellow dancers. You are one of the few teachers I’ve known that seems to enjoy teaching even more than performing and I think that’s really special. Can you tell us more about that?

Jo Boring:

First of all, thank you. That’s a lovely thing to say and I receive it and I thank you for it because that means a lot to me. If that is the vibe I’m putting out, then I’m happy about that because that is absolutely true. Or it’s what I want to be true, it’s what I want to put out into the world.

I love dancing. I do, don’t get me wrong, but what I love even more than dancing are connections and community and friendship and care. If I think about the thing that I get the most out of dancing or teaching or being in a troupe or anything like that, it’s moments of sharing that experience that I just don’t get when I’m doing something by myself because the thing that I liked the best about it is the connections.

Of course, I would love to improve my technique and I care about dance and I care about dancing well, but I always tell the Lunachix, I don’t care if we mess up, whatever happens it’s more important to me to have that vibe of just authenticity and kindness. That would be the most important thing that I would want to impart. So, thank you for thinking that.

Alicia:

You’re welcome. Yeah. It’s really special because I think a lot of people that go into teaching, they do it because they can support further performing with it, but I just see that-

Jo Boring:

Sure and there’s nothing wrong with that. But no, I agree with you and I love performing,

but I learned somewhere along the way to kind of like the process a little bit more.

I don’t know that it started that way. I think a lot of us start and we’re like, “Oh, costumes.” Of course, that stuff is fun and I still like all of those things. But yeah, it’s cool to look back and see that you’ve grown something with people and that you’ve learned and grown and laughed and cried and those things. And I will say in summation, it’s very important to me, and I’ll go back to Jill and Amy, if you take their class, they treat everyone in their class the same and it doesn’t matter if someone’s the best dancer or it doesn’t matter if they just walked off the street. It doesn’t matter if they’re wearing fancy dance clothes or if they’re like… It doesn’t matter. And I always have appreciated that and that’s what I want to be like. I want everyone to be allowed and there to be no prerequisites for entry.

Alicia:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). And you can see that by how long you guys have danced with the same group of people. You treat your people well. I mean honestly, think about that. There are a lot of teachers, I think, that I have different things that they value and people go in and out of their troops faster.

Jo Boring:

Yeah, it’s hard. I’m flawed. We’re all flawed. There’s some joke, people ruin everything. Sometimes there’s hard stuff and every group or troupe, everybody goes through something and if they say they don’t, they’re lying. I think it goes back to the intention thing from before. If your intentions are good and you’re trying to put something good into the world, you’ll make mistakes, but they probably won’t be unforgivable ones.

Alicia:

Nice.

Jo Boring:

I like forgiveness. I’m into it.

FEEL GOOD LOOK GOOD HABIT

Alicia:

Do you have a feel good, look good habit that you want to share?

Jo Boring:

All I need are red lips and a dream. I’m telling you, I’m certainly not somebody who thinks that I can’t go out of the house without makeup. I go around looking like something special pretty often in terms of just kind of walking out of the house and not giving a care. Trust me on that. You don’t have to look for long to know that that’s true, but I like a little pep in my step. I always loved Gwen Stefani growing up. I just love that signature red lip. It’s like a power suit. If I have that, it’s just like a little quick pick me up. You know?

Alicia:

Such a simple modification that is very noticeable. Right?

Jo Boring:

Yeah. And it’s just color. I wear a lot of black, so it’s just a pop of color. I also like a good winged eyeliner. So yeah, even though that’s makeup and that’s superficial, hey, works for me.

Alicia:

Tell us about something exciting that you have coming up.

Jo Boring:

So, I’ve really been enjoying theatrical shows, Murder Mystery Belly Dance shows are something that I’ve been into for the last couple of years and I used to make a joke when I quit my full time school job because I wanted to dance more. I made a joke that I was quitting to go write a murder mystery, but it was kind of true. I mean it was kind of not true, there was more going on, but really when I thought about what I was most excited about having time to do, I wanted to do my murder mystery. I had dreamt about it for years and I just never had the time. So, I love games. I like making everything into a game. I’m inspired and passionate about having dance shows that are general public friendly and that are contagiously fun and that bring new fresh blood into the community.

Jo Boring:

Obviously, I like theatrical stuff and I like it when people let me have the microphone so I get to emcee them because it’s my show so I can. So, I’ve had a tremendous amount of fun with that. We’ve called it historically the Bloody Ballyhoo. In April, several of the Luna Chicks are going across the pond and we are going to put on a Murder Mystery show in Brighton, UK…

Alicia:

What?

Jo Boring:

… With the many dancers you may have heard of before. Amy Sigil said she’d be in it. I don’t have the other ones signed on the dotted line, not that they have to sign anything. I won’t mention names just because I haven’t confirmed, but I’ll start promoting it soon and I’m sure you’ll see names you recognize from the London dance scene. Pretty exciting. I’m going in April to an Amy Sigil intensive and I was in Brighton with Jill and I was talking about the murder mystery and I just thought, why not put it all together? And so that is something that I am super, super, super excited about.

Alicia:

Jo, thank you so much for being such a delightful and entertaining guest and fun person to talk to, an inspiring teacher and person who really cares about others. Thank you so much. We have a lot of exciting things to watch out for in the future with you and Tessa True Heart and Belly, Set, Go!

Jo Boring:

I love you. You’re fun.

Alicia:

Did everyone just hear Jo profess her love to me? It’s because I fed her wine at Super Fun Dance Camp late at night.

Jo Boring:

It’s because you’re super, super fun and super, super nice. And that’s a mean combination.

Alicia:

Thank you, Jo Boring. All right, have fun. Listen, so both of these interviews with Tessa True Heart and Jo Boring are out. So subscribe. Thanks for listening.

Jo Boring:

Bye, y’all.